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Published on August 27th, 2012 In category Education | English

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Reading Comprehension- Practice set 5

This is a fifth in set of Reading comprehension to practice your English comprehension for competitive examinations.

This post is contributed by Stanley John– He has over 25 years of experience in Teaching English,Spoken English, Personality Development, Interview Skills. If you would like to connect with him, please drop in your comments down here.

The other post writtern by him can be check over here

If you would like to learn the techniques for building speed and accuracy in Reading Comprehension the please check out our other article over here … Reading Comprehension Techniques

Here goes the passage, please read it carefully,

Is the art of conversation lost as some would have us believe? Conversation. Everybody agrees we need it. But do we make conversation simply for the sake of it? Michael Oakeshott, one of the greatest British political philosophers, opined that general conversation shouldn’t have a goal or a well defined subject. He liked “an unrehearsed, intellectual adventure”.
Conversation requires good humour, curiousity, mutual respect, high levels of tolerance and shared knowledge – when someone has to explain a reference, conversation withers. Today, conversation is a dying art. Thanks to e-mail, chat, text messaging, video games and of course, television. Another villain is politics. At one time it stimulated conversation. Now it seems to be a talk killer. Everyone is so divided in their opinions that it is hard to talk about politics in genial conversation. Those who don’t have opinions, end up mirroring TV news panels, which often consist of people angrily shouting at one another, least interested in what anyone else is saying and sans a clue about what he is saying.
Good conversation should be interesting. It shouldn’t be an exercise of thrusting one’s opinion on the others. The world’s greatest anticonversationalist is one who burdens his fellowmen with dull monologues on various subjects. The ideal conversationalist is one who possesses the art of repartee – he needs no subject and can make fascinating, the most banal conversation.
Repartee – quick, witty comments or replies

Questions from this passage

Q1. What are the characteristics of a conversation?
Q2. Why is conversation a dying art?
Q3. Why is politics a conversation killer?
Q4. Who is an anticonversationalist?
Q5. How has modern technology reduced conversation?
Q6. What is the characteristic of an ideal conversationalist?
Q7. Name one word from the passage that means:
i) Single person speaking continuously
ii) Unoriginal and ordinary

Q8. Do as directed:
i) Everyone is so divided in their opinions that it is hard to talk about politics. (Rewrite using ‘too’)
ii) The world’s greatest anticonversationalist is one who burdens his fellowmen with dull monologues on various subjects. (Make it simple sentence)

Answers
A1. Conversation has good humour, curiousity, mutual respect, high level of tolerance and shared knowledge.
A2. Because of popular mediums like e-mail, text messaging, chat and television, there is no direct contact with persons. Hence lack of conversation is making it a dying art.
A3. Everyone is so divided in their opinions that it is hard to talk about politics in genial conversation.
A4. An anticonversationalist is one who burdens his fellowmen with dull monologues on various subjects.
A5. Modern technology has removed the scope for face to face contact thus limiting a whole hearted conversation. Popular mediums like e-mail, text messaging limits expression and can often be misinterpreted.
A6. An ideal conversationalist possesses the art of repartee. His witty and quick replies can make even an ordinary conversation, fascinating.
A7. i) Monologues
ii) Banal
A8. i) Everyone is too divided in their opinions to talk about politics
iii) The world’s greatest anticonversationalist burdens his fellowmen with dull monologues on various subjects.

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Comments

  1. stanleyjohn says:

    If you want to develop the art of repartee, read P G WODEHOUSE’s novels.